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Contemporary Economics

Page history last edited by PBworks 13 years, 1 month ago

Contemporary Economics -

 

Syllabus

John Bouchard M.Ed.

2007-2008

Early College Learning Community

 

Text and Supplemental Materials - Resources:

 

Contemporary Economics, William McEarchern

Thomson- Southwestern 2005, Edition 1

 

Florida Times Union Newspaper ( every Tuesday) News papers in education.

 

CNN Headline News- Cable news channels

 

Online financial sites- DOW Jones and NASDAQ

 

A variety of primary and secondary sources will be used throughout the course.

 

Internet searches and digital research will be employed.

 

Current Events will be required weekly.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

 

Contemporary Economics provides solid coverage of fundamental economic topics. Concentrating on the NCEE (National Council on Economic Education) standards, the text moves students from the basic question of “What Is Economics?” through clear and visual explanations of demand, supply, market equilibrium, decision making, market institutions, the national economy, government’s role, public policy, and the international economy. This brand new high school instructional package combines comprehensive economic content, sound instructional design, and extensive print and media teaching tools.

A wealth of print, video, electronic, and online resources make it simple to address varied learning styles, use formal and informal assessment, and integrate technology where it makes sense to you. Take a tour of the online resources available at the Xtra! Web Site by visiting http://econxtra.swlearning.com. Excellent features allow students to learn economics by experiencing economics

 

This is a 18 week course on the A/B Schedule, you will have this course for 2 grading periods.

 

Economics Units of Study

 

( Each Unit will take approx. 2 weeks or 5- ( 90 minute) class periods to complete material)

 

 

 

 

UNIT 1 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS

Chapter 1 What Is Economics?

Chapter 2 Economic Systems and Economic Tools

Chapter 3 U.S. Private and Public Sectors

 

UNIT 2 THE MARKET ECONOMY

Chapter 4 Demand

Chapter 5 Supply

Chapter 6 Market Forces

Chapter 7 Market Structure

 

UNIT 3 MARKET INSTITUTIONS

Chapter 8 Businesses

Chapter 9 Labor Markets

Chapter 10 Financial Markets and Business Growth

 

UNIT 4 THE NATIONAL ECONOMY

Chapter 11 Economic Performance

Chapter 12 Economic Growth

Chapter 13 Economic Challenges

 

UNIT 5 PUBLIC POLICY AND THE NATIONAL ECONOMY

Chapter 14 Government Spending, Revenue, and Public Choice

Chapter 15 Fiscal Policy, Deficits, and Debt

Chapter 16 Money and Banking

Chapter 17 Money Creation, the Federal Reserve System, and Monetary Policy

 

UNIT 6 THE INTERNATIONAL ECONOMY

Chapter 18 International Trade

Chapter 19 Economic Development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CORRELATION

CURRICULUM FRAMEWORKS

 

 

COURSE TITLE: Economics

 

COURSE NUMBER: 2102310

 

SUBMISSION TITLE: Contemporary Economics, by William McEachern, © 2005, ISBN- 0538437006

 

PUBLISHER: Thomson Learning/South-Western

 

 

INTENDED OUTCOMES

(Number and outcome) PAGE(S) OR LOCATION(S)

WHERE TAUGHT

I/M*

1. Demonstrate understanding of the basic economic problems and questions that must be answered by every society. Chapter 1 “What is Economics?” pp. 4-31 I

SS.A.1.4.2 identify and understand themes in history that cross scientific, economic, and cultural boundaries. “Connect to History” features, Chapters 1-19 I

SS.D.1.4.1 understand how many financial and nonfinancial factors (e.g., cultural traditions, profit, and risk) motivate consumers, producers, workers, savers, and investors to allocate their scarce resources differently. Chapter 1 “What is Economics?” pp. 4-31 I

2. Classify economic systems in terms of how a society answers the basic economic questions. Chapter 2.1 “Economic Questions and Economic Systems” pp. 33-40

Unit 2 “The Market Economy” pp. 98-221

SS.D.2.4.1 understand how wages and prices are determined in market, command, tradition-based, and mixed economic systems and how economic systems can be evaluated by their ability to achieve broad social goals such as freedom, efficiency, equity, security, and growth. Chapter 2.1 “Economic Questions and Economic Systems” pp. 33-40

Unit 2 “The Market Economy” pp. 98-221 I

3. Demonstrate understanding of how economic and government institutions apply basic economic concepts and the possible results. Chapter 4 “Demand” pp. 100-229

Chapter 6.1 “Market Forces” pp. 162-189

SS.D.2.4.2 understand how price and quantity demanded relate, how price and quantity supplied relate, and how price changes or controls affect distribution and allocation in the economy. Chapter 4 “Demand” pp. 100-229

Chapter 6.1 “Market Forces” pp. 162-189 I

 

INTENDED OUTCOMES

(Number and outcome) PAGE(S) OR LOCATION(S)

WHERE TAUGHT

I/M*

SS.D.2.4.3 understand how government taxes, policies, and programs affect individuals, groups, businesses, and regions. Chapter 3.3 “Public Goods” pp. 75-81

Chapter 3.4 “Providing a Safety Net” pp. 82-91

Chapter 7.3 “Antitrust, Economic Regulation, and Competition” pp. 208-215

Chapter 13 “ Economic Challenges” pp. 386-423

Chapter 14 “Government Spending, Revenue, and Public Choice” pp. 428-457 I

SS.D.2.4.4 understand how United States fiscal policies and monetary policies reinforce or offset each other and how they affect levels of economic activity, the money supply of the country, and the well-being of individuals, businesses, regions, and the nation. Chapter 15 “Fiscal Policy, Deficits, and Debt” pp. 458-483

Chapter 17.2 “Monetary Policy in the Short Run” pp. 525-535

Chapter 17.3 “Monetary Policy in the Long Run” pp/ 536-543 I

4. Demonstrate understanding of concepts essential for measuring economic performance and explaining economic phenomena. Chapter 11 “Economic Performance” pp. 320-351

Chapter 12.2 “Living Standards and Labor Productivity Growth” pp. 366-374

“E-conomics” pp. 332, 372 & 472

“Ethics in Action” p. 349

“In the News” pp. 321 & 475

“NET Bookmark” pp. 322, 331, 337, 360, 389, 408, 469, 476, & 568

“Team Work” p. 331

SS.A.1.4.4 use chronology, sequencing, patterns, and periodization to examine interpretations of an event. “Sequencing” p. xxxiii I

SS.B.2.4.1 understand how social, cultural, economic, and environmental factors contribute to the dynamic nature of regions. “E-conomics” pp. 166, 571, 592

“Ethics in Action” pp. 79, 559, 606

“In the News” pp. 33, 68, 82, 357, 407, 553, 567, 574, 587, 597, 603

“Net Bookmark” pp. 38, 398, 600

“Span the Globe” pp. 8, 52, 65, 111, 136, 182, 194, 230, 258, 307, 328, 378, 417, 444, 463, 506, 539, 563, 601

SS.D.2.4.5 understand basic terms and indicators associated with levels of economic performance and the state of the economy. Chapter 11 “Economic Performance” pp. 320-351

Chapter 12.2 “Living Standards and Labor Productivity Growth” pp. 366-374

“E-conomics” pp. 332, 372 & 472

“Ethics in Action” p. 349

“In the News” pp. 321 & 475

“NET Bookmark” pp. 322, 331, 337, 360, 389, 408, 469, 476, & 568

“Team Work” p. 331 M

5. Demonstrate understanding of the complementary and competing objectives between and within economic systems. Chapter 2.1 “Economic Questions and Economic Systems” pp. 33-40

Chapter 19.1 “Developing Economies and Industrial Market Economies” pp. 587-596 M

SS.A.3.4.8 understand the effects of the Industrial Revolution. “The Industrial Revolution” p. 64

“Connect to History” pp. 124 & 157 M

SS.D.2.4.6 understand factors that have led to increased international interdependence and basic concepts associated with trade between nations. Chapter 18 “International Trade” pp. 552-585

Chapter 10 “ Economic Development” pp. 586-611 M

6. Demonstrate understanding of the economic dimensions of historical and contemporary issues. “Connect to History” pp. 351, 381, 411 & 446

“Connect to History” pp. 581 & 611

“From the Great Depression to the Early 1970s” pp. 405-406

“The Great Stagflation: 1973-1980” pp. 406-407

“Since 1980” p. 408

“Connect to History” pp. 125 & 157

“Connect to History” p. 411

“The Great Depression and Before” p. 404

Chapter 19.3 “Infrastructure and Rules of the Game” pp. 604–605 I

SS.A.3.4.9 analyze major historical events of the first half of the 20th century. “Connect to History” pp. 351, 381, 411 & 446 I

SS.A.3.4.10 understand the political, military, and economic events since the 1950s that have had a significant impact on international relations. “Connect to History” pp. 581 & 611

“From the Great Depression to the Early 1970s” pp. 405-406

“The Great Stagflation: 1973-1980” pp. 406-407

“Since 1980” p. 408 I

SS.A.5.4.1 know the causes of the Industrial Revolution and its economic, political, and cultural effects on American society. “Connect to History” pp. 125 & 157 I

SS.A.5.4.4 understand social transformations that took place in the1920s and 1930s, the principal political and economic factors that led to the Great Depression, and the legacy of the Depression in American society. “Connect to History” p. 411

“The Great Depression and Before” p. 404 I

SS.B.2.4.7 understand the concept of sustainable development. Chapter 19.3 “Infrastructure and Rules of the Game” pp. 604–605 M

7. Demonstrate understanding of personal economic practices. “Economic Choices” p. 6

“Market Participants” pp. 15-16

SS.C.2.4.6 understand the argument that personal, political, and economic rights reinforce each other. “Rational Ignorance” p. 449 M

SS.D.1.4.1 understand how many financial and nonfinancial factors (e.g., cultural traditions, profit, and risk) motivate consumers, producers, workers, savers, and investors to allocate their scarce resources differently. Chapter 1.1 “The Economic Problem” pp. 5-9

“Span the Globe” p. 8 M

SS.D.1.4.2 understand credit history and the positive and negative Discussion of credit cards, pp. 479, 509

M

8. Apply research, study, critical-thinking, and decision-making skills and demonstrate the use of new and emerging technology in problem solving. Research, study, critical-thinking, and decision-making skills: throughout text

Demonstrate the use of new and emerging technology in problem solving: “E-conomics” features Chapters 1-19 I

SS.A.1.4.3 evaluate conflicting sources and materials in the interpretation of a historical event or episode. “Social Studies Skills” pp. xxvi - xxxiii I

 

 

Grading Policy, Procedures, and Make-Up Work:

At the beginning of each unit, students will receive an assignment log. This log will detail

all reading and writing assignments for the unit. The assignment log will also include dates

for quizzes, seminars, notebook checks and tests. Students are expected to stay on track with the

assignment log – even if they miss class.

 

If a student is absent they are expected to turn in assignments within 2 days of their return –

otherwise it is considered LATE. Late work will be accepted, but points will be deducted

from the grade (10% deduction per day). Quizzes or tests missed due to an absence must

be made up before or after school. The deadline for quiz/test make up is one week from

the return date of the student.

 

Each student is required to maintain a notebook for this course. This notebook will be

brought to class everyday. The notebook will be organized by unit and will include all

notes, writing assignments and handouts for the unit. Students will find that this notebook

will be a valuable study tool as the AP exam approaches.

 

Quarter grades will be based on how many points the student earns for quizzes, seminars,

notebook checks, tests, assignments and class participation. The grading scale is as follows:

90-100 = A, 80-89 = B, 70-79 = C, 60-69 = D, and 59 or below = F.

 

Grade Recovery Policy:

The Duval School District grade recovery guidelines are, as follows: Any student

receiving a D or an F in a course for a quarterly grade may attempt grade recovery

regardless of absences. Participation in the grade recovery process does not guarantee

a grade change. If all requirements are successfully completed by the due date(s), an “F”

may be changed to a “D” and a “D” may be changed to a “C.” The grade recovery process

is made up of two requirements: satisfactorily completing any work not successfully

completed during the quarter or not submitted during the quarter, and performing satisfactorily

on a comprehensive AP style exam. Any written assignment that previously received a grade

less than “C” must be submitted. The teacher will provide a list of written assignments

that must be completed. These written assignments must be submitted prior to the

administration of the comprehensive AP exam, the administration of which will take place

 

after school on a date determined by county deadlines. Because the exam includes a

complete multiple-choice section, a Document Based Question and two essays, the exam

will take three (3) hours to complete. Come prepared with pencils, pens, and plenty of

paper. No other previous tests may be retaken for the purposes of the grade recovery

process because the AP exam will suffice as a substitute for any and all previously taken

tests. In order for your grade to be “recovered,” the following must occur: (1) All of the

required written assignments must receive a satisfactory grade (“C”) or higher; (2) Your

score on the comprehensive AP exam must be one letter grade higher than your original

quarter grade: you must receive at least a “D” if your original grade was an “F” and you

must receive at least a “C” if your original grade was a “D.”

 

 

Instructor contact via school phone 381-9898 x224 or

Email- BouchardJ@dreamsbeginhere.org

 

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